Proper Battery care and maintenance – DO’S

    • Under normal circumstances, we recommend charging when a battery reaches 80% depth of discharge (near the “red zone” on most discharge meters) not before.
    • Most new batteries are designed to provide 1,500 charge “cycles” or more. If your application is light to medium duty, or sporadic, charge only when necessary rather than daily. This will spread the cycle life of the battery over a much longer period, ensuring maximum number of productive years from your investment.
    • Select “weekend”, “equalize” or “weekly” charge (depending on your brand of charger) approx. every 5 to 10 cycles to keep the battery performing at peak efficiency. Failure to do so or selecting this option too often will harm the battery and shorten its effective life.
    • Schedule your workload around battery refuelling times
      This reduces downtime and the risk of accidents caused by drivers rushing to recharge when the battery is running low.
      Remember: Batteries should not be put on charge more than once a day
    • Give your battery a lunch break
      It's tempting to fall into the bad habit of quickly charging your truck during break times. In the trade this is known as 'opportunity charging'. A battery's lifespan is determined by its charge cycles (i.e. how many charges it's had). Short charges will result in steadily declining battery efficiency - to the point where it won't charge at all. Instead, allow your truck to cool off during downtime.
    • If a battery ever overflows, take a few minutes to rinse it with water immediately afterwards (baking soda optional) to prevent corrosion on top of and beneath the battery. Use enough water to thoroughly dilute the spilled acid to the extent that it is not harmful to the environment.
    • The spilled acid is both highly conductive and corrosive. If not rinsed away, the conductivity can cause the battery to discharge itself, even while it is not in use, and generate addition heat during recharge.
    • Over time, acid left on top of the battery will form clumps of conductive white corrosion. If it is allowed to accumulate, it can dramatically shorten the life of the battery and make checking and adding water an unpleasant experience which employees will tend to avoid, as well as cause obvious safety concerns.
    • Acid vapours escape during charge, and residue will develop around the vent cap area even under normal circumstances. We recommend that batteries be rinsed every spring and fall (or as needed), to remove the acid residue
    • If a battery ever overflows, take a few minutes to rinse it with water immediately afterwards (baking soda optional) to prevent corrosion on top of and beneath the battery. Use enough water to thoroughly dilute the spilled acid to the extent that it is not harmful to the environment.
    • The spilled acid is both highly conductive and corrosive. If not rinsed away, the conductivity can cause the battery to discharge itself, even while it is not in use, and generate addition heat during recharge.
    • Over time, acid left on top of the battery will form clumps of conductive white corrosion. If it is allowed to accumulate, it can dramatically shorten the life of the battery and make checking and adding water an unpleasant experience which employees will tend to avoid, as well as cause obvious safety concerns.
    • Acid vapours escape during charge, and residue will develop around the vent cap area even under normal circumstances. We recommend that batteries be rinsed every spring and fall (or as needed), to remove the acid residue